Sin Nombre

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clare5092

Re: Sin Nombre

#31 Post by clare5092 » Tue Aug 11, 2009 4:20 pm

Hi,

I went to watch this film on Sunday at the Cornerhouse in Manchester and really enjoyed it. There were no trailers and the cinema was approx two thirds full I would say! I found the most shocking moment when Smiley was showing all his young friends his new gun and the fact that they all seemed in awe of him. I agree with bevvy in that there are some cases where people genuinely would struggle with subtitles for a variety of reasons. However I embarrassingly have to admit that I am one of the very odd few who hate the "giant black bars"! Ha! It would not cause me not to watch a film though - it would just slightly irritate me!

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Re: Sin Nombre

#32 Post by bevvy » Tue Aug 11, 2009 4:33 pm

The thing that I have a problem with is those sign language interpreters that you get on some TV programmes in the middle of the night.

I find it so distracting that I have been known to stick a sheet of paper over that part of the screen. For that reason, I always make sure when booking theatre tickets that it is not a 'sign language interpreted' performance - I am sure that I would end up looking at them rather than the play, I am so easily distracted!
Last edited by bevvy on Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Sin Nombre

#33 Post by elski » Tue Aug 11, 2009 6:41 pm

I've actually found at a few of the showroom screenings (not free ones) I've been to recently that there's an audio description going on which you can't hear during loud scenes but as soon as it's quiet it sounds like someone whispering, but it took me a while to realise it's coming from the screen! and if I strained to listen you could hear it was describing what was going on. And once you 'tuned in' to it it can be a bit of a distraction. I don't know whether blind people have such good hearing they can hear it as normal or they have something to amplify it though.
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koolkat2009

Re: Sin Nombre

#34 Post by koolkat2009 » Tue Aug 11, 2009 7:13 pm

bevvy wrote:The thing that I have a problem with is those sign language interpreters that you get on some TV programmes in the middle of the night.

I find it so distracting that I have been known to stick a sheet of papeer over that part of the screen. For that reason, I always make sure when booking theatre tickets that it is not a 'sign language interpreted' performance - I am sure that I would end up looking at them rather than the play, I am so easily distracted!

The signers often block something integral to the programme. With todays technology wouldn't you think that this could be 'switched on' as you can with subtitles rather than being forced to have it on all the time.

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Re: Sin Nombre

#35 Post by MIB » Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:03 pm

Caught this at Screen On The Green in Islington. 1st time at the venue and agree with how my gf described it..."very cute". Had a very theatrical feel to it. As for the film, very glad i went and thoroughly enjoyed it. 8/10

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Re: Sin Nombre

#36 Post by ejwrank » Fri Aug 14, 2009 5:53 pm

I got my nephew tickets for this in Nottingham and he says

"It was great. Very well shot I thought, beautiful as well as terrifying, totally recommend it."

I was surprised to see a starting time of 12.30 pm which allowed a late sleep on Sunday and still the chance to see a free film preview. And of course I am considered a very nice aunt in getting him tickets.
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Re: Sin Nombre

#37 Post by een2afc » Tue Aug 18, 2009 9:41 pm

Sin Nombre Review

Not for the faint hearted, Cary Fukunaga’s new road trip come love story Sin Nombre is the latest in a string of films to portray the frenzied and tumultuous life in Mexican gang culture. The film focuses on one Honduran family’s struggle to realise their dream of a better life in the US as they travel from Honduras, through Mexico, with other hopeful immigrants who have taken Central America’s ultimate gamble.

The story follows Sayra (played by Paulina Gaitan), a young Honduran girl who is reunited with her father after several years. After what appears to be the briefest of discussions, they agree (along with Sayra’s brother) to attempt the treacherous road that will lead them to a better life. This lonely road lies along the path of the dangerous Mexican gangs however and in particular the Mara Salvatrucha. The “Mara”, as they are colloquially known, are full-body tattooed gangsters who thrive on bloodlust and constant battle with other gangs.

Whilst Sayra begins her journey through Mexico, Willy (or El Casper to some of his less than trustworthy comrades) is a young “Mara” has been teamed up with a new child recruit; Smiley and the two of them trawl the Mexican streets together. Unfortunately for El Casper’s career in the “Mara” he has fallen for a girl in another town and becomes “otherwise engaged” whilst supposedly looking after his gang duties (and telling Smiley to keep schtum). His plans of romance become scuppered however when his gangland brothers find out about his romance and the beauty in question finds herself butchered at the hands of the “Mara” leader.

The real twist of fate occurs when Casper, Smiley and the “Mara” gang leader all board the US bound train which Sayra and her family find themselves on. After a robbery turns sour, and a vengeful Casper kills the “Mara” leader in a desperate attempt to save Sayra’s life, Smiley is ordered to find and kill Casper by the remaining “Mara” members.

The story subsequently descends into a frantic game of cat and mouse with Sayra’s family pleading for her to leave the young gang member with a price on his head alone, whilst Smiley and the other Mara gangsters track Casper’s path ready to murder him.

Eventually Sayra doesn’t heed her family’s pleas anymore and finds herself alone on the road with Casper. Despite several attempts on his life, the pair make it to a safe house upon where Sayra is told of her brother’s capture and father’s death, yet the courageous girl and melancholic Casper still march on, US bound.

The intelligence of Sin Nombre is the key to this film. Fukunaga manages to find a likeness in both gangland and family cultures, with squabbles, togetherness and ties broken along the most desperate of roads. Gaitan’s interplay with Flores (Casper) is magnetic and Fukunaga’s Mexico is shot in somewhat of a documentary style on gang warfare more than a tale of love lost.

The trump card is played by the innocent Kristian Ferrer (Smiley) who shows loyalty to the gang beyond his years. His performance is perhaps the most chilling and reflective of a lawless culture where murder has power over love.

Rating 4.5/5

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Re: Sin Nombre

#38 Post by ch4ndresh » Tue Sep 01, 2009 7:52 pm

Brilliant story..brings you back to reality..however if it was dubbed in english then it would have been even more enjoying.....adios amigos...

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Re: Sin Nombre

#39 Post by koolkat2009 » Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:47 am

ch4ndresh wrote:Brilliant story..brings you back to reality..however if it was dubbed in english then it would have been even more enjoying.....adios amigos...
Oh purlease! Do we really need every film to be dumbed down and dubbed into English to enjoy it?
Try to appreciate a film when the language native to the relevant country is used is far better than when it has foreign actors speaking in a language that is foreign to them. Surely you don't want every film to be 'Americanised'?

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Re: Sin Nombre

#40 Post by phunkygal » Mon Sep 07, 2009 9:18 pm

Obviously the beeb dont wanna accuse but looks like this filmmaker was killed because of his film on the Mara, was only days after La Vida was on tv there

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/8235174.stm

A French-Spanish film-maker who made a documentary about gang life in El Salvador has been shot dead there, officials say.

Christian Poveda, who was in his 50s, was found dead in a car north of the capital, San Salvador, police said.

His 2008 film La Vida Loca (The Crazy Life) followed the violent lives of members of the Mara 18 street gang.

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